Pros and Cons Part 5: Alcohol

Many people have opposing opinions regarding recent studies surrounding the influence that alcohol has on vocalization, in individuals who have been diagnosed with spasmodic dysphonia.
I’ll scientifically and unilaterally explain this.
I have 22 categories that influence breathing and vocalization. Let’s try to figure out who is right.(5)
Part1:gargle
Part2:humidifier
Part3:aspirator
Part4:sports
Part5:alcohol
Part6:sex
Part7:bicycle
Part8:dance
Part9:gum
Part10:cigarettes
Part11:plane
Part12:boat
Part13:turtleneck
Part14:tie
Part15:yawning
Part16:humming
Part17:whispering
Part18:nap
Part19:pillow
Part20:roller coaster
Part21:karaoke
Part22:XXX

Part 5 is “Alcohol”

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This section is primarily focused on the clarification of recent studies surrounding the effects of alcohol on patients who have been diagnosed with Spasmodic dysphonia, which I refer to as “SD.” Spasmodic dysphonia is a vocal disorder, characterized by involuntary movements and/or spasms of the muscles of the larynx during vocalization. There are four types: Adductor spasmodic dysphonia, Abductor spasmodic dysphonia, Mixed spasmodic dysphonia (which is a combination of the previous two types), and Whispering dysphonia.
SD is a disorder, not a disease, which means treatment and therapy options are available.
In cases I have studied, of patients with Spasmodic Dysphonia, I’ve found that the effects when drinking alcohol vary. The variables present that must be considered are, the type of SD present, the degree of the disorder the patient has, and the amount of alcohol being consumed.
In previous research, 90% of SD patients find it easier to let out their voice shortly after drinking small amounts of alcohol. For example, a single glass or wine or a single bottle of beer.
However, they claim to feel “hoarse,” “husky,” and “choking,” as time passes, and after increasing the quantity of consumption. After drinking greater quantities of alcohol, they confirm these effects began worsening. The remaining 10%, felt sluggish and claimed they could not let out their voice at all, soon after drinking (both small and large amounts) alcohol.
I verified the above results and have determined the types of SD(Adductor spasmodic dysphonia, Abductor spasmodic dysphonia, Mixed spasmodic dysphonia, and Whispering dysphonia) associated with these findings.
The 90% category range of patients have been diagnosed with AD/SD(Adductor spasmodic dysphonia). The remaining 10%, had mixed types of SD.
As you can see from the results presented, the after effects of drinking alcohol vary with the types of SD. Through observation, the highest and lowest percentile of subjects surveyed, felt that alcohol negatively effected their disorder as time progressed and intake increased.
This is the most current information, surrounding the results and studies of SD and alcohol.

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