The adhesion of fascia on the cricothyroid muscle

It is not easy to find the fascia of the pendant moiety or the oblique part on the cricothyroid muscle.
If you have enough experience to inspect the cricothyroid muscle, you will be able to determine the size and movement of the pendant moiety and the oblique part.
You also can know that everybody has a different cricothyroid muscle. These variances can be small or large,. The most common being having a muscular cricothyroid muscle, different sizes when comparing between the right and left muscles, having problems with moving muscles due to LDP, muscles that are really thin, or although the cricoid cartilage is big the cricothyroid muscle very well may be small.
However, sometimes, I cannot find the boundary between the pendant moiety and the oblique part on the cricothyroid muscle.
In my case, when that happens I try to look for the fascia of the cricothyroid muscle by first moving the sternohyoid muscle.
Then I sometimes find people who have the adhesion of facsia between the pendant moiety and the oblique part on the cricothyroid muscle.
If there is an adhesion of fascia between the pendant moiety and the oblique part, the cricothyroid muscle sometimes has a problem with moving, because the muscle’s movement is being restricted.
The top reasons causing adhesion are (1)External injury (massaging too strong, someone/something hitting your throat, choking your neck.e.g.) (2)Too extreme or hard vocal training (shouting too much, spending an extremely long time vocalizing, vocalizing with excessive tension.e.g.) or (3)Innate/hereditary.
The signs of adhesion are minimal. As a matter of fact many people report that there is no pain and that they can even talk normally, but definitely feel obstructed when letting out a high-pitched voice.
When I treat someone for this issue, I separate the fascia from the muscles. Doing this fixes the movement of the cricothyroid muscle, making it easy to let out a high-pitched voice again.

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